Then I get invited for a Covid test. Back to the experts for advice on what to do while on chemo. Same varied response from different people. Once again, I’m having to figure out what I should do. I’m thinking I should get it, and everyone advises to have it when the immune system is at its strongest, for me that means day 13 after chemo. So off I toddle to the vaccination centre and am promptly temperature checked and asked a few questions. When I tell the guy I had covid in January he uttered the comforting word, “bollocks” and rushed off to find a doctor. After a small debate I’m reassured I’m ok to have the jab and take my seat in the waiting room. It is a really slick process and I’m done in about 45 minutes. I go home with a dead arm, watch some TV and go to bed.

I wake up at 6am with full Covid symptoms. This isn’t good – the chemo nurses are due in a few hours!

Long story short – no one is happy with my condition, so chemo is delayed a week to be on the safe side. What I end up discovering is that my 48-hour reaction is because I have had Covid so recently – too many anti bodies, I guess!

Onto cycle 10. This doesn’t go so well either. I have the worse diarrhoea which just doesn’t quit. Things take a turn for the worse after 10 days as my temperature hits 38.5. This isn’t good for someone on chemo due to the propensity to get a bacterial infection and then sepsis. Great, A&E for me. The experience is actually amazing – always is for the cancer club – proper VIP stuff. Lots of tests and after about 8 hours I’m sent home with the standard anti biotics after confirming an undisclosed viral infection.

Cycle 11 approaches but my bloods are not great, and I still feel pretty weak – chemo delayed a week. Uuurgh